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How to Deal with Dental Anxiety

Do you feel anxious when seeing a dentist? Does the thought of going to your dentist stress you out? You’re not alone! Many people have fear of seeing their dentist due to previous bad experiences. Anxiety is usually a fear about a future event. You’re worried about something that might happen.

There is no need to worry! Finding the right dentist can help soothe your mind and make you feel more comfortable. There are many ways that your dentist can help to make you feel comfortable and make your visits pain free!

Take a look at the article posted by Dr. Seven Lin on 7 Simple Tricks to Deal with Dental Anxiety

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Why are my teeth sensitive to hot or cold?

Do you pass on having hot or cold drinks? Do your teeth feel sensitive when you breathe in or when you’re eating sweets? It may be time to speak with your Dentist about teeth sensitivity.

Teeth sensitivity can be caused by numerous thing such as: brushing too hard, eating acidic foods, drinking soda, or even bleaching.

Take a look at the article posted by WebMD explaining What Can You Do About Sensitive Teeth?

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Why do your teeth shift?

Considering that your teeth are securely anchored to your jawbone, they might seem immovable without orthodontia. But teeth shifting out of alignment can occur for several reasons other than when braces are first removed. Not only that, the shift can cause problems with your bite that may result in jaw, facial or neck pain if left untreated.

If you’ve noticed a shift in your smile, it’s helpful to know that some movement is common for everyone. But in some cases, you may need the guidance of a dental professional.

Take a look at the article posted by Colgate explaining Why Does Teeth Shifting Happen

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How to keep your teeth healthy longer with age

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Aging isn’t always pretty, and your mouth is no exception. A century ago the need for dentures in later life was almost a foregone conclusion. Today, three-quarters of people over 65 retain at least some of their natural teeth, but older people still suffer higher rates of gum disease, dental decay, oral cancer, mouth infections, and tooth loss. While these problems are nothing to smile about, you can still do a lot to keep your mouth looking and feeling younger than its years.

Take a look at the article posted by AARP on how to keep your teeth healthy longer with age:

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